Lauren. 20, Colorado, Homestuck, LGBTQWTFBBQ.

I am a citizen of the Internet. I do things sometimes. Some of those things will go here. Yeah.

 

Even those of us that sincerely enjoy shooters can’t shake the feeling that there is something fundamentally unsettling about them. Even though most of the articles I write about shooters are praising positive things about them, I always feel obliged to add caveats. The Modern Warfare trilogy is an absolutely magnificent example of how to tell a scripted story in a videogame—even if that story makes absolutely no sense and the trilogy completely alienates and vilifies the stereotypical Russian and Arabic enemies in really problematic ways. The Gears of War games are a terrific example of how to convey a game’s tone through its core mechanics, with its seminal cover system evoking the intensity and claustrophobia of an utterly futile war—even as the games laughably ask us to weep for a character’s dead wife moments after he trash-talked an enemy while stomping on his brains. Far Cry 2’s open vistas and persistently uncontrollable skirmishes give an intensity to its violence matched by few games—even as it chooses to depict a nation without civilians, a conflict without collateral.

There’s no shortage of shooters that want to be about something. But very few shooters are brave enough to look in the mirror—or to force the player that enjoys shooters to look in the mirror—and question what they see. Not to pass judgment. Not to ask them to change their ways. Just to understand what is going on here.

Brendan Keogh. Killing is Harmless (via thewovenweb)

comicsalliance:

VAMPIRE BATMAN, HYPNOTIC INDUCTION, AND GOD: GRANT MORRISON TALKS ‘THE MULTIVERSITY’ [INTERVIEW]
By Matt D. Wilson
For years now, DC Comics fans have been hearing about writer Grant Morrison’s The Multiversity – a universe-jumping series of one-shot stories tied together by an introductory and concluding issue that tracks the cosmic monitor Nix Woton as he tries to save multiple universes from an existential threat. Universes that become aware of this threat by reading about it in comic books… comic books that, it turns out, take place in neighboring universes. We first saw artwork from Frank Quitely’s installment all the way back in 2012, but the project has been in the works since even before the advent of DC’s line-wide 2011 reboot, the New 52 (a name that has proven confusing in the past, but, we promise, never more so than in this interview).
Now it’s finally starting next month, featuring auspicious collaborations with artists including Cameron Stewart, Ben Oliver, Chris Sprouse, Ivan Reis, Frank Quitely, and even more besides, introducing readers to a Vampire Batman, a Nazi Superman, a dinosaur cop, “Sister Miracle,” an evil comic book called Ultra Comics, and tons of other ideas inspired by the deep history of DC Comics lore.
Some of that lore actually comes from other companies, of course, and those elements will be prominently represented in Multiversity. The Shazam family of characters originated in the Fawcett Comics titles of the 1940s, and take a prominent role in Multiversity’s “Thunderworld” issue drawn by Cameron Stewart. Likewise, the heroes acquired by DC from Charlton Comics — such as the Question and Blue Beetle — star in their own issue with artwork by Frank Quitely, who with Morrison will place the characters into a story and style reminiscent of Watchmen, the Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons graphic novel inspired by the same characters.
If that’s not deep enough for you, maybe you’d prefer the Chris Sprouse-drawn world of Earth 20, the home of DC’s World War II era heroes like Doctor Fate (or “Doc Fate”, as he’s known in Multiversity) and Lady Blackhawk. There’s also Earth 16, drawn by Ben Oliver, where the descendants of Superman and the rest of the greatest DC heroes have become vapid, grotesque celebrities like something out of reality television.
But those are just a few details of what will be seven much more fleshed out universes, but even those are just seven of 52. There’s a lot to keep track of, so in addition to Multiversity itself, DC and Morrison will release a guidebook that will finally — seven years since it was introduced in 52 — break down and explain the DC multiverse. Somehow fittingly, the book will feature Jack Kirby’s Kamandi, the last boy on Earth, and include a multiversal map designed by Rian Hughes showing where each of DC’s 52 universes lies on a cosmic landscape.
From what we can see, the Monitor Sphere and the Sphere Of The Gods oversee all of creation, with perhaps lesser entities residing in realms identified as Apokalips, Nightmare, Hell, Underworld, Dream, Heaven, New Genesis, or Skyland. All the universes are contained in an “Orrery of Worlds,” a concept you may remember from 52, the series Morrison wrote with Geoff Johns, Mark Waid and Greg Rucka that excavated the multiverse from DC’s continuity basement.
We sat down with Morrison at Comic-Con International in San Diego for a few minutes to dig into all these events and ideas and talk about how The Multiversity has evolved over its long production.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

VAMPIRE BATMAN, HYPNOTIC INDUCTION, AND GOD: GRANT MORRISON TALKS ‘THE MULTIVERSITY’ [INTERVIEW]

By Matt D. Wilson

For years now, DC Comics fans have been hearing about writer Grant Morrison’s The Multiversity  a universe-jumping series of one-shot stories tied together by an introductory and concluding issue that tracks the cosmic monitor Nix Woton as he tries to save multiple universes from an existential threat. Universes that become aware of this threat by reading about it in comic books… comic books that, it turns out, take place in neighboring universes. We first saw artwork from Frank Quitely’s installment all the way back in 2012, but the project has been in the works since even before the advent of DC’s line-wide 2011 reboot, the New 52 (a name that has proven confusing in the past, but, we promise, never more so than in this interview).

Now it’s finally starting next month, featuring auspicious collaborations with artists including Cameron Stewart, Ben Oliver, Chris Sprouse, Ivan Reis, Frank Quitely, and even more besides, introducing readers to a Vampire Batman, a Nazi Superman, a dinosaur cop, “Sister Miracle,” an evil comic book called Ultra Comics, and tons of other ideas inspired by the deep history of DC Comics lore.

Some of that lore actually comes from other companies, of course, and those elements will be prominently represented in Multiversity. The Shazam family of characters originated in the Fawcett Comics titles of the 1940s, and take a prominent role in Multiversity’s “Thunderworld” issue drawn by Cameron Stewart. Likewise, the heroes acquired by DC from Charlton Comics — such as the Question and Blue Beetle — star in their own issue with artwork by Frank Quitely, who with Morrison will place the characters into a story and style reminiscent of Watchmen, the Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons graphic novel inspired by the same characters.

If that’s not deep enough for you, maybe you’d prefer the Chris Sprouse-drawn world of Earth 20, the home of DC’s World War II era heroes like Doctor Fate (or “Doc Fate”, as he’s known in Multiversity) and Lady Blackhawk. There’s also Earth 16, drawn by Ben Oliver, where the descendants of Superman and the rest of the greatest DC heroes have become vapid, grotesque celebrities like something out of reality television.

But those are just a few details of what will be seven much more fleshed out universes, but even those are just seven of 52. There’s a lot to keep track of, so in addition to Multiversity itself, DC and Morrison will release a guidebook that will finally — seven years since it was introduced in 52 — break down and explain the DC multiverse. Somehow fittingly, the book will feature Jack Kirby’s Kamandi, the last boy on Earth, and include a multiversal map designed by Rian Hughes showing where each of DC’s 52 universes lies on a cosmic landscape.

From what we can see, the Monitor Sphere and the Sphere Of The Gods oversee all of creation, with perhaps lesser entities residing in realms identified as Apokalips, Nightmare, Hell, Underworld, Dream, Heaven, New Genesis, or Skyland. All the universes are contained in an “Orrery of Worlds,” a concept you may remember from 52, the series Morrison wrote with Geoff Johns, Mark Waid and Greg Rucka that excavated the multiverse from DC’s continuity basement.

We sat down with Morrison at Comic-Con International in San Diego for a few minutes to dig into all these events and ideas and talk about how The Multiversity has evolved over its long production.

READ MORE

Presented without context because it’s funniest that way.

Also, from the same book:

"It was not hard for me to think of nothing, the way I felt at the moment. In order not to think of any one thing, all I had to do was think of many things, a little at a time: just think about something for a moment and fling it into space."

That’s kind of how I am a lot of the time, and it helps me understand why Delirium was the character I related to the most in Sandman.

"Do you know the story of the monkeys of the shitty island?" I asked Noboru Wataya.
He shook his head, with no sign of interest. “Never heard of it.”
“Somewhere, far, far away, there’s a shitty island. An island without a name. An island not worth giving a name. A shitty island with a shitty shape. On this shitty island grow palm trees that also have shitty shapes. And the palm trees produce coconuts that give off a shitty smell. Shitty monkeys live in the trees, and they love to eat these shitty-smelling coconuts, after which they shit the world’s foulest shit. The shit falls on the ground and builds up shitty mounds, making the shitty palm trees that grow on them even shittier. It’s an endless cycle.”
I drank the rest of my coffee.

The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, Haruki Murakami

I think we expect heartfelt character-driven stories with memorable people to look like The Walking Dead or Breaking Bad or whatever, but more often they look like Papers, Please or Achewood, and there’s a kind of subtlety there that isn’t often appreciated.

I know there was a good reason I stopped reading Subnormality, but I can’t remember what it was, so now I’m reading it again, and it’s good.

theladymonsters:

magesmagesmages:

sounds-simple-right:

badscienceshenanigans:

kbdownie:

thegingermullet:

Did they ever reveal how Captain America was thawed? Because I’m picturing a bunch of Shield agents with hair dryers and I don’t think that’s quite right.

I don’t think they’d want to microwave him so hair dryer is really the only remaining option. That’s how I’d do it.
badscienceshenanigans
Do you have a sciency way to accomplish this task?


Well, let’s see. 

To thaw a 1.5 metric ton colossal squid frozen in a block of ice (the only way the fishermen who trawled the thing in could bring it home before it went bad), scientists put it in a big vat of brine just above 0 Celsius/32F. That allowed the fresh water to melt while still keeping the squid as cold as possible. Essential, since for a giant corpse with tentacles, certain parts are bound to thaw days before others and could become quite rotten before the rest comes out of the ice block if you’re not careful. 

HOWEVER Captain America was still alive, which complicates things. On the other hand, even supersoldiers are significantly smaller than this record-setting colossal squid. This helps thaw logistics somewhat.

Much like the squid, Captain America would have to be kept at a consistent temperature throughout his body in order to be thawed successfully. If his extremities were to thaw more than a minute or two before his heart and lungs were thawed and reactivated, the tissue wouldn’t have any oxygen and would quickly die. What a shame to bring back Steve Rogers only to have him be the poster boy for gangrene. Brain tissue becoming metabolically active before the cardiovascular system began functioning would be even more disastrous— possible permanent brain damage. 

And the GH-325 project was born

To keep his temperature as equal as possible across his entire body, something like the squid brine or (more likely) an antifreeze solution would be used. Immerse the Capsicle in brine until the entire unit is within a degree or two of thawing* to begin Phase II.

*Note that due to presence of salts, fats, protein, etc, the freezing point of meat is actually 28-29F. Apologies to non-US readers, sadly I only work with American meat and don’t know the freezing point of corpses/beef in Sane Country Units. That being said, Steve Rogers is 100% American meat. Fahrenheit shall be considered the appropriate unit for this project. 

At the thawing point, it’s important to consider life support functions. I don’t know how fast human tissue uses up oxygen at refrigerator-range temperatures, but I’m going to assume that the sooner you have oxygen circulating the better. A heart-lung machine would be needed to oxygenate and move the blood around for a while before the heart gets started back up. 

Meanwhile, because Captain America’s last un-frozen moments were spent deep underwater, there may be decompression issues at play. Whatever gas bubbles may have been present in his tissue are currently frozen in place, but when he thaws they can move about and create embolisms —> the bends. Better put him in a hyperbaric chamber just in case. 

Since Captain America regained consciousness in a recovery room rather than during the thaw process, it may be safe to assume that he was sedated and/or placed in a drug-induced coma during thaw. 

So at this point we’ve got a giant bathtub of brine, a heart-lung machine, oxygen canisters, lots of drugs, plus all the necessary monitoring equipment all inside a hyperbaric chamber. After thawing the antifreeze bath could be replaced with gradually warming water or saline solution in order to bring Captain America back up to normal body temperature. So many machines! This is US medicine at its finest.

Forced warm air blowers (hairdryers) are needed after Captain America is fully thawed, organ systems are reactivated, and he is brought back to normal body temperature. At this point it becomes necessary to dry and style Captain America and put him in period-appropriate jammies to sleep it off in a vintage hospital room. If you think hearing the wrong baseball game tipped him off fast, you should see him wake up with bad hair. 

image

THIS IS THE BEST POST IN THE HISTORY OF EVERYTHING.

That being said, Steve Rogers is 100% American meat. Fahrenheit shall be considered the appropriate unit for this project. 

thewovenweb:

rumetzen:

booleanearth:

alkthash:

thedrunkenminstrel:

How many horses do you think Scott Snyder punched in celebration of Batman’s 75th anniversary?

Either 75, or one horse for every Batman issue he has written. 

Wait wait wait, reblogging this again because I realized: Scott Snyder is the anti-Andrew Hussie.

What does that even mean?

Basically, Hussie really loves horses, whereas Snyder really hates horses (If their comics are anything to go by) (They are not)

Exactly, they both have a memetic obsession with horses (that the real people do not actually have, but as characters they do), and Hussie’s is positive while Snyder’s is negative.

thatscienceteacher:

theveganarchist:

stfuconservatives:

lesserjoke:

antigovernmentextremist:

gerrycanavan:

Jury nullification. Pass it on.

Jury nullification is so fucking important.

This is something that more people should be aware of, if only because (in many states, at least) defense attorneys are actually prohibited from mentioning it to jurors. The law allows a jury to return a “not guilty” verdict contrary to the facts of the case, but not for the defense to inform them of that power or to argue for its application in the current trial.

I didn’t know about this. Wow.

always reblog

This is SUPER IMPORTANT and also a good reason to show up for jury duty. You know all those laws you think are stupid? This is your chance to maybe do something about it. 

Except sadly, all of you just shot your chances of ever being selected for a jury. CGP Grey made a pretty good video about Jury Nullification here.

thatscienceteacher:

theveganarchist:

stfuconservatives:

lesserjoke:

antigovernmentextremist:

gerrycanavan:

Jury nullification. Pass it on.

Jury nullification is so fucking important.

This is something that more people should be aware of, if only because (in many states, at least) defense attorneys are actually prohibited from mentioning it to jurors. The law allows a jury to return a “not guilty” verdict contrary to the facts of the case, but not for the defense to inform them of that power or to argue for its application in the current trial.

I didn’t know about this. Wow.

always reblog

This is SUPER IMPORTANT and also a good reason to show up for jury duty. You know all those laws you think are stupid? This is your chance to maybe do something about it. 

Except sadly, all of you just shot your chances of ever being selected for a jury. CGP Grey made a pretty good video about Jury Nullification here.

alkthash:

thedrunkenminstrel:

How many horses do you think Scott Snyder punched in celebration of Batman’s 75th anniversary?

Either 75, or one horse for every Batman issue he has written. 

Wait wait wait, reblogging this again because I realized: Scott Snyder is the anti-Andrew Hussie.